Experiences Frequent Headaches

Recurring headaches are common in both children and adults. Headaches, although uncomfortable and annoying, are most often transient and harmless on the physical level. Usually headaches are a bodily response to emotional stress; once the stress is properly addressed, the headaches will decrease or even disappear. Sometimes headaches are caused by external physical factors (see examples below). Of course, there are also rare occasions when headaches are an actual sign of disease or injury. It always pays to be cautious when kids complain about frequent pain of any kind. A trip to the doctor can not only help rule out health issues but can also provide information on controlling the frequency, duration and intensity of headaches and migraines. Similarly, a trip to a naturopath, osteopath, or cranial sacral specialist may be able to provide assessment and treatment interventions that can help.

If your child has  frequent headaches consider the following tips:

Stress  
Life is actually not a bowl of cherries for children – it is stressful! Kids and teens have social challenges, academic problems, sibling issues, issues with their parents, step parents, other family, and many other issues as well. They feel pressure and stress just like adults do. Stress can cause many bodily symptoms, including stomach aches, anxiety, depression, illness and of course, headaches. If your child tends to complain about frequent headaches, try to address stress factors first. Perhaps she has too much on her plate. More rest, improved nutrition,  increased support and a more balanced schedule will usually help reduce anyone’s stress-related headaches. Or, perhaps there is something going on in your child’s life that is overwhelming, frightening or otherwise disturbing. Try asking your child about this possibility. If you use Emotional Coaching (naming and accepting feelings without offering education, judgment or criticism of any kind), your child may open up to you. Sometimes just talking things through can relieve significant amounts of stress. Also teach your child that everyone needs to talk to someone – having a friend, a school counselor, a parent or a professional to talk to can really keep stress in its place and prevent it from wreaking physical or emotional havoc.

If you do suspect that stress is the culprit behind the headaches, you might also teach your child specific stress-management self-help strategies. HeartMath is a simple, child-friendly program for stress reduction that helps reduce stress and manage pain. Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is another one that kids and teen can use to help calm upset and troubled emotions. There are many books on emotional regulation and stress-management geared specifically to children and teens – bring them home from the library; your kids will have a chance to learn strategies for releasing stressful feelings. This is especially important for those kids who just don’t “open up” – the exact kids who are most prone to physical manifestations of stress.

Stress that doesn’t completely resolve with self-help home measures is best addressed by a mental health professional.

Vision Issues
Headaches, especially those symptomized by a throbbing pain near the nape, can be a sign that a child is experiencing vision problems. The strain of reading the blackboard when one’s vision is less than 20/20 can cause frequent headaches. The same goes with spending long periods in front of TV screens and computer monitors. In all cases of regular and frequent headaches, a trip to an ophthalmologist is recommended. Very often, a child doesn’t realize that he or she is not seeing properly or has other eye-related issues.

Nutritional Factors
Missing meals can cause a cascade of chemical effects leading to headaches. For instance, skipping a meal lowers blood sugar, which in turn increases blood pressure which can cause headaches. Dehydration is also a possible cause of frequent headaches in children. Not having enough fluids in the body can cause the constriction of tissues in the brain and the spinal cord, leading to headaches.

Sensory Overstimulation
In today’s age of iPods and mp3 players, kids’ ears often get abused. In fact, a very recent study released by BMC Neurology has revealed that cranking up the music for even just an hour or two is associated with pounding headaches among teenagers. (In addition, long-term exposure to loud music using earphones can result into tinnitus, the perception of sound, e.g. ringing or buzzing, when none exists.)

Viral Infections
Headaches have been known to be associated with various viral infections. This is because issues with the nasal pathway as well as the throat can cause constrictions in the blood vessels in our head. When the infection is treated, the headache disappears. Fortunately, bed rest and a diet rich in fluids and vitamin C can usually address symptoms associated with the common cold, cough or flu. There are also many over-the-counter medications, herbal products, essential oils and other medical and natural interventions that address the whole umbrella of symptoms associated with viral infections.

Sensitivities and Allergies
If your child’s headache tend to occur after exposure to a particular food, pollutant or situation, then consider the possibility of an allergy or sensitivity-related headache. Eating foods rich in soy sauce, for example, has been known to trigger mild to severe migraine in some children. However, any food sensitivity can trigger frequent headaches and a child may be sensitive to any food group. For instance, many children have been found to be sensitive to wheat, gluten, milk, sugar and/or eggs. In order to rule out allergies and sensitivities,  consult an immunologist or an allergy specialist. Many naturopathic practitioners also test for food insensitivities.

A Final Thought
It is not only unpleasant, but it is also uncomfortable and draining to suffer from routine headaches. You may have to use a multifaceted assessment and treatment process in your attempts to relieve your child’s pain. However, when people are willing to pursue all avenues, they almost always find a measure of relief from pain.

Difficulty Swallowing Pills

Pills are everywhere in our modern life – even natural supplements tend to be in pill or tablet form. It’s important that children know how to swallow pills because they may have to take a medicine that comes in tablet form.

The following are some tips on how to deal with kids who have difficulty swallowing pills, tablets or capsules:

Try Treating the Fear First
Fears can often be treated with self-help first. Of course, if your child’s fear of swallowing is intense, provoking feelings of overwhelm or panic, consult a child psychologist – often a short course of treatment can fully resolve the problem. However, if your child is willing to let you help him or her at home, then you might consider a simple intervention that helps many people who have fear of swallowing pills –  EFT (emotional freedom technique). This form of acupressure involves tapping on the body while feeling the fear. It is easy to learn and easy to do – you’ll find d lots of “how-to’s” on the internet – just search for “EFT fear of swallowing pills.” There are special demonstrations for children as well. Sometimes, it only takes a few minutes to cure a fear of swallowing pills using this technique. If you prefer, you can take the child to a mental health professional who is trained in EFT or a similar intervention. Again, the professional may be able to solve the problem in just one session, although it sometimes takes longer.

If your child still has difficulty swallowing pills despite your own interventions or that of a professional, consider the possibility of a physiological cause for the problem and ask your doctor to investigate the matter further.

Provide Positive Reinforcement
If your child is trying to conquer the problem at home, keep in mind that he or she is dealing with something that is truly difficult to overcome. Even adults sometimes have a problem with this activity! Be careful not to mock or minimize the problem your child is having. Instead, provide understanding (“I know it’s hard”) and encouragement (“you can do it” ) as they are trying. Celebrate victories with praise and even a small reward for persevering and trying.

Try Alternative Preparations of Medications and Vitamins
Until your child can swallow pills, you can work around the problem. Be careful not to give up, however; fears of this kind do not tend to vanish on their own – avoidance of the issue simply prolongs it. Meanwhile, however, you must still give the child his or her medications. Therefore you need some temporary solutions.

In general, medications for young children are in liquid or chewable tablet form. However, kids may come to need a particular drug that has no kid-friendly formulation. Medications for ADHD for example, are often still in tablet or capsule form. Until your child learns to swallow pills, you can ask your pediatrician or pharmacist if they know of liquid alternatives that you can use, or if there is a way to transform the drug into liquid without losing its potency.

Break It Down
Perhaps the pill is really too big for your child. The good thing is, some pills can be broken down into smaller pieces. Many pharmacies do sell tools for cutting pills neatly, so you won’t have to worry about breaking yours into a pulp. Dividing a pill may mean more pills to swallow, but it’s worth it if it will give your child an easier time.

Dissolve It
Or you can grind the pill into powder and add it to a fruit juice. (In the case of capsules, you can simply break open the capsule for the powder inside.) If the pill is tasteless, your child won’t even notice that he or she is drinking medicine. If the pill has a distinctive taste, choose a particularly strongly-flavored drink, such as a fruit concentrate. Note though that you must always ask your pharmacist first of dissolving the pill in liquid will alter its effect on the body.

Dip It or Bury It
If the pill is small enough, you can dip the pill first in peanut butter, ice cream or gelatin. Doing so might help it slide down your child’s throat easier. It will also make the taste of the pill more palatable to a disgusted child.

Eating to Improve Focus, Attention, and Concentration

There are lots of reasons why a child might have trouble focusing – there are so many possible internal and external challenges. Some children’s brains have a very low tolerance for boredom; for these kids focus is hard to attain unless they are engaged in an activity that holds their interest. Some kids have such active minds that everything seems to grab their attention, viagra making it hard for them to zero in one on just one thing. Teens are particularly prone to self-induced fatigue (from staying up too late) which makes focused attention hard for them. Moreover, health in today’s world of beeping, bleeping toys and tools, everyone seems to have a harder time focusing.

No matter why a child is having trouble focusing. dietary changes may help. Consider the following tips:

Certain Foods Contribute to Inattention
Many studies associate sugar consumption with symptoms of restlessness and inattention. Different children have different levels of reactivity and sensitivity to different kinds of sugar. The only way to know whether removing a particular sugar is going to help your child’s ability to focus, is to experiment. Having said this, keep in mind that most people of all ages suffer negative effects of high amounts of sugar in the diet. To do your experiment, remove, or even just significantly reduce, a source of sugar from your child’s diet and note what happens. Start with high glycemic sugars like white sugar and brown sugar. Move on to maple syrup, honey and agave. If you are using other sugars, remove them as well as part of your experiment. What is wrong with processed and refined sugar? They would immediately go to your child’s bloodstream, increasing his or her blood glucose level. High blood glucose means that your body will have difficulty metabolizing essential nutrients. The immediate impact of high blood glucose is stress inside the body, making it difficult to focus and concentrate.

Increase Protein
Centers in the brain responsible for attention and focus rely on two amino acids: tyrosine and tryptophan. Consuming a diet rich in these two amino acids can help increase focus. Protein-rich foods like meat, eggs and dairy products are high in tyrosine and tryptophan. The same goes for soy, nuts and legumes. Bananas, brown rice, tomatoes, avocado, pineapples and beets are also good vegetarian sources of tyrosine and tryptophan. In addition, there are natural tyrosine and tryptophan supplements available in health stores.

Eat Moderately
Note: the ability to focus depends not just on what you eat, but on how much you eat. If your child eats too much – even if the food is wholesome –  feelings of fatigue and lethargy may impact on the ability to concentrate. Similarly, eating too little will make a child prone to hunger pangs and stress – making it all the more difficult to concentrate. Children in the habit of skipping meals are less likely to be able to focus than children who eat on time regularly.

Consider Food Sensitivities
Sometimes food intolerances, sensitivities or allergies can agitate a child’s entire body and mind. This can cause a range of disturbances that might impact on concentration and focus such as foggy brain, hyperactivity, distractibility, anxious feelings and more. A professional naturopath, dietician, allergist, medical doctor or other health care provider may be able to help you explore this possible cause of focusing difficulties. Or, you may experiment with adding and subtracting foods from the diet in a systematic way to note whether concentration improves or worsens in relation to those changes.

Lurking Dangers in the Home

About to bring home your newborn? Make sure the air is free from excess dust and pollutants than can cause serious damage to an infant’s lungs. Your baby’s starting to walk? Make certain the stairs are safely gated, and there are no shaky pieces of furniture that might topple over. Have a curious preschooler living under your roof? You better secure all things sharp, hot and toxic.

As your children go through the various stages of their development, the risk that they might encounter a household hazard gets higher. And yet, your home should be the safest place in the world for your children. To make it so, you will need to exert some effort to make it child proof.

The following are some of the common causes of accidents in the home, and ways parents can help protect their kids from them:

Poison Risks
Children are curious by nature. They grab anything that catches their eye, opening boxes and bottles just to discover what’s inside. In addition, little ones learn by “mouthing” everything – they don’t think twice about putting whatever they touch right into their mouth. Therefore, in order to protect your children from poisonous chemicals in the house, make sure these chemicals are out of reach, preferably in locked cupboards. Although you may not think you have chemicals in your home, chances are that you have plenty – including those in your everyday cleaning supplies such as bleaches, detergents, soaps, alcohol, medicines and insecticides. Many households also have cans of paints, home-repair supplies (paints, oils, varnishes, abrasives, adhesives (glues) and other extremely toxic substances.

Electrocution Risks
When babies are already crawling and toddlers are already walking, low outlets can be a cause of an electrocution accident. If moving the outlet is inadvisable, install outlet covers and plates to prevent electrocution. Make sure too that you set your child’s play areas way away from outlets.

Outlets are not the only electrocution risk in the house. Studies show that electrical cords of appliances can be an accident risk if they are kept uncoiled and within reach of children. Many people leave cords plugged into the wall but not plugged into the appliance or electronic device they are meant to charge. Curious little hands can grab a dangling cord and stick it into the mouth “to see what happens.” Make sure your cords are neatly tied and kept safely away from kids. If you can put protective covers on electrical cords as well, better. When cords are not in use, remove them from the outlet.

Suffocation and Strangulation Risks
Many new parents don’t realize, that even simple materials can pose suffocation and/or strangulation risk for their children. Stuffed toys, beddings and blankets, for example, can suffocate a baby in a crib if they’re not set neatly and properly. Plastic bags that accidentally make their way to a baby’s mattress can also suffocate an infant. Remember, newborns are not yet capable of removing hazardous materials that come near them; it’s up to parents to make sure they’re safe.

Phone cords, strings from toys, and bed sheets are all also strangulation risks. Now is the time to invest in cordless phones! Similarly, always make sure that bed sheet fits snugly around the mattress, with no extra cloth hanging about. Once your child is mobile, keep plastic bags stored in high cupboards rather than the lower, more accessible locations of your kitchen cabinets and storage areas.

Falls and Tumbles Risks
Once your baby starts crawling or walking, he or she can go anywhere! You’ll want to make sure your home is safe for an exploring child. Put gates at the top and bottom of stairways until your child can safely negotiate stairs. If a room has fragile or dangerous items in it (i.e. a computer desk with lots of wires dangling beneath), keep that door shut (or better yet, locked). Get down on your hands and knees and look at each room from that perspective – what can get knocked over? What can the child trip on or smash his head into? You might want to store sharp-edged end tables for a year or two – bring them back when the child has better control over his or her movements.

Slipping Risks
Check your floors; are they slipping risks? Don’t use slippery wax for cleaning your floors when you know you have a child around. For places that tend to get wet, such as bath areas, or areas near the faucets, set rubber guards on the floor.

Cutting Risks
Keep sharp objects out of the reach of children. Scissors, knives and other sharp items can accidentally poke an eye or do other serious harm when in the hands of an over exuberant toddler or reckless child. Preschoolers are notorious for doing “hairdressing” experiments – cutting their own or another child’s hair when parents aren’t looking. The resultant bad hairdo is the least of the potential dangers of this activity, as the eye-hand coordination of small children often provides inadequate control over unwieldy scissors – accidents can happen. Therefore, keep scissors in locked cabinets if possible.

Err on the Side of Caution
Many parents are inclined to believe that their child is too smart to get into trouble with household items. The truth is that accidents can happen regardless of how smart someone is! Keeping safety considerations in mind can only help.

Managing T.V. Time

Experts agree that too much TV is not healthy for kids. There are studies that associate high TV time with physical problems like obesity, sick heart disease and sleep disorders, as well as psychological symptoms like attention deficits and lack of focus. Violence on TV is believed to promote aggressive behavior in children and the values emphasized in TV shows are known to be internalized by the kids who watch them.

While most parents are in consensus that too much TV is not a good thing, not all are on the same page regarding how much TV is too much. Experts also disagree as to how much is enough – although some researchers peg 2 hours a day or less as a good number. But the issue is not really numbers, rather balance. Parents must ask themselves the question: does their child’s TV time keep him or her away from other important and valuable activities?

If you feel that your child is watching too much TV at the expense of time for other important activities, consider the following tips:

Children Need Parental Help in Structuring the Time Wisely
Studies have shown that engaging in social activities like playing, talking with peers or engaging in group activities, helps to promote neurological development. In other words, it would be a lot better for your child to relate with people than to stare at the television. There are other brain healthy activities as well such as doing puzzles, playing solitary challenge games, building with lego and other construction toys, playing with dolls and figurines, drawing, reading, do clay or creative crafts and so on and so forth. Hobbies like dance, gymnastics, music lessons, sports, collecting things, and so on all teach valuable skills and build competencies and confidence. The computer also offers some very valuable activities but take your time to explore the kinds of games and interactive learning opportunities that can really help your child grow and thrive. Even mindless computer games require more activity than watching T.V., but you will probably want to limit those to a small proportion of what your youngster is doing with his computer time.

Separate Eating from Watching
The reason why a lot of TV addicts are obese is because they can’t sense that they are already full. The human anatomy’s multitasking skill has limits. The brain is too busy processing what is being watched and listened to on the television, causing other functions to be compromised. If kids must eat while glued to the tube, give them just a few healthy (and low calorie) snacks to chew on.

Separate Sleeping from Watching
There are plenty of reasons for a child NOT to fall asleep watching T.V. For one thing, T.V. stimulates the brain, either interfering with the ability to fall asleep easily and naturally, or promoting an agitated sleep and disturbing dreams. In addition, having a T.V. in the bedroom encourages kids to isolate themselves from the rest of the family. While this may not be a major problem for older teens (who treasure their privacy in any case), it is not a healthy thing for children who still can benefit from plenty of family interaction. Finally, when a child is locked in his or her room with a black box, parents will easily lose track of the amount of time a child is in front of the T.V. and the situation can quickly get out of hand.

T.V. can be a Family Affair
If you want to control what your kids watch, be there with them! Transforming TV viewing as a family activity creates opportunities for discussions; parents can therefore protect their kids better from negative messages found in popular media.

Create TV Time Curfews and Consequences
Allot a specific amount of TV time per day and week. At the same time, put in any rules you desire about what kind of shows can be watched and not watched. For instance, do you want to allow young children to watch the news or sophisticated adult programming? Do you want them to have a certain amount of leisure T.V. like comedy shows, adventure, cartoons and so on, and a certain amount of educational shows on subjects like science, history, crafts, cooking and so forth? Or, do you want to let them watch whatever they want to watch within their time period? Think it through and then discuss it with them at a family meeting.

In addition, set up consequences for those who fail to abide by the house rules. You are the parent, trying your best to guide your child. This is not a debate between you and the child – remember, YOU’RE actually in charge in your home! Therefore, non-compliance with the rules should always result in a reasonable negative consequence (i.e. removal of the privilege of watching T.V. for a day or two – see Raise Your Kids without Raising Your Voice by Sarah Chana Radcliffe for a detailed protocol on using negative consequences).

Talking to Teens about Sex

You may have already had a chat with your pre-teen about the body, the female menstrual cycle, and even how babies are made, so you may feel that you’ve done all you need to do. However, as your child grows into his or her teens, there is good reason to have another chat. The stakes are higher now as it is increasingly likely that your youngster will actually have some sort of active sexual life before marriage and before the age of twenty. In fact, he or she may have several intimate partners during this period. To be healthy and safe, your child needs accurate information. If you do not talk to your teenager about sexuality, your child will still learn about it — perhaps from sources you won’t approve of. Not all schools offer quality sex education; most kids glean information about sex from the internet, TV and well-meaning (but not necessarily knowledgeable) peers. If you want to make sure your teen understands sexuality the right way, it’s best to invest time in “the talk.”

How to Speak to Your Teen about Sex
The ideal way to talk about sexuality is the way a doctor would do it – in a friendly, matter-of-fact, educational sort of tone. “Parental” talk full of threats, dire warnings, judgments and so on, can backfire, causing your child to go underground, get answers elsewhere and/or become deceptive. In fact, if you feel that you can’t speak about this subject calmly and non-judgmentally, you can actually make an appointment for your doctor to give over the important health information to  your child. On the other hand, if you feel up to being the educator, you may want to research the topic of sexual disease, using books, internet and medical resources like your doctor. You want to be sure to give your child the right information because if your child finds that you have been exaggerating or fabricating or just giving wrong information on one or two points, then he or she may disregard your entire message.

Utilize Resources
When talking with your child, you can use books designed especially for teens on this subject – ask your local librarian to suggest some titles. Leave a couple of books around the house (and in the bathroom) for your child to leaf through. Books make the information less personal – the truth is that it’s not YOUR ideas you are trying to ram down the child’s throat, but rather, it’s just a collection of objective facts and information. Most books will discuss both the physical health concerns and also the emotional aspects of intimacy. You should also address both aspects, helping your child be aware of his or her impact on other people as well as being prepared for the intense emotions that can be triggered by intimacy. Ideally you can discuss the differences between having sex and having a relationship.

Be Honest and Open
You should mention your personal values regarding sexuality, while acknowledging that your child will have to form his or her own opinions on this important subject. Emphasize, too, that what popular culture and media has to say doesn’t always reflect your own personal values or your family’s values. Go ahead and discuss how the media represents sex and sexuality, exploring current cultural values regarding love, marriage and intimacy. Compare and contrast these values with your own. Help your child to understand why you feel whatever you feel on this topic. For instance, if you believe that a person should only be intimate in the context of a serious relationship, be prepared to explain why you feel this way. At the same time, acknowledge that your child may feel differently. This acknowledgment helps prevent your child from having to reject your values, as it gives him or her space to evaluate what you are saying and see how it fits and feels. Although you are making it clear that you do have opinions and values, you want to keep that tone non-judgmental. This will allow your child to ask questions. And be prepared – he or she may have LOTS of questions.

Confront the Issues Head On
Today’s culture encourages bi-sexuality, homosexuality and to some extent, promiscuity (a large selection of intimate partners). Polygamy, open-marriages, serial divorce, “friends with benefits” and all sorts of other intimate relationships are rampant. Be ready to give your opinions about all these lifestyle issues and the reasons for the way you feel – but be careful to continue to speak in a tone that is soft and welcoming. Acknowledge that other people have their own opinions on this topic. Be proactive if you want, and ask the child what he or she thinks about these things. If the child says that he or she has cravings for the same sex, acknowledge that this is common as we grow up, but that almost all people develop a specific sexual orientation over time. If the child feels that he or she is bisexual, then again, acknowledge that this is a common feeling and then discuss the pro’s and con’s of each lifestyle. If you have a religious perspective, offer it. However, even if you believe that homosexuality is a grave sin, continue to express your ideas respectfully and calmly. As it says in Proverbs, “The words of the wise are heard best when spoken softly.” In other words, having a temper tantrum won’t help your child choose a healthy path. If your child is confused and wants help, offer to arrange a meeting with a spiritual advisor and/or a professional who specializes in sexuality or adolescent psychology.

What Parents Should Know About Fast Food

There are many facts that every parent should know about fast food. Here are some for starters:

1. Fast foods are often heavy in calories

An adult would have to walk for seven hours straight to burn off a Super Sized Coke, French Fries and a Big Mac. Younger kids with smaller bodies are consuming an even greater proportion of unnecessary calories unless they are eating child-sized meals. But even then, these foods have way too many calories. In fact, this is why fast food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. Left unabated, obesity will soon surpass smoking as the leading cause of preventable deaths in America. Moreover, even if one doesn’t die from obesity but simply lives with it, quality of life is often impaired. Obesity has been linked to: hypertension, coronary heart disease, adult onset diabetes, stroke, gall bladder disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, respiratory problems, endometrial, breast, prostate and colon cancers, dyslipidemia, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance, breathlessness, asthma, among other serious diseases.

3. Fast foods are high in preservatives and low on nutritional value

4. Most nutritionists recommend not eating fast food more than once a month

5. Fast food is possibly linked to cases of increased inattention and hyperactivity in children

Even with the release of the educational film “Super Size M” in 2004, there has been no real decline in fast food sales in America. On the contrary: fast food consumption is on the increase! And yet, many parents still wish they could feed their kids three nutritious meals a day.

If you are one of these parents, here are a few tips on how to inspire your kids to avoid fast food:

Provide the Necessary Information
Explain why fast food is harmful. Fortunately, there are now some really excellent picture books that can help you get your point across to both young children and teens. The series entitled “Eat This, Not That” provides a wealth of information in a fun format that appeals to kids of all ages. Although one of the books is specifically addressed to young people (“Eat This, Not That, for Kids”), the other books are also highly accessible. Parents can read and discuss the material at the dinner table and/or just leave the book(s) lying around the house. “Dr. Shapiro’s Picture Perfect Weight Loss” is another wonderful educational aid, interesting to the whole family.

Condition Them to Like Healthy Foods
Cook healthy delicious food at home. The trick here is to get your child’s palette used to the taste of healthy food and to come to prefer it over the the taste of commercially prepared fast foods. If your kids are used to the fast food taste already, then help them make a gradual transition to a healthier diet. At first, offer foods that are similar to fast food – for instance, introduce fruit shakes in place of ice teas, sausages instead of hot dogs, pesto instead of spaghetti, tacos instead of chips. Gradual transitions can help kids adjust to a new diet more easily.

Avoid stuffing food in the refrigerator for your kids to heat via microwave whenever they are hungry. Microwaved food tastes a bit too much like fast food. Instead, as often as possible, sit down together and eat freshly prepared meals. Even the act of sitting down together is an important step in developing a healthy food consciousness, regardless of what is being served.

Introduce Your Kids to the World of Good Food
Consider introducing “fine cuisine” into your family culture. Get cookbooks out of the library and experiment with interesting, even exotic dishes. Bake up a storm. Teach the kids how to do the same, approaching them in ways appropriate for their age. When people taste really good food, they often become “food snobs” – preferring quality food to “fast food” any day. All the lectures about health and well-being can’t compete with the impact of the taste of really delicious food!

Night Terrors

Does your child wake up screaming during the night? Sometimes nighttime screams are triggered by a nightmare, but sometimes they happen for no apparent reason. If your child is waking in fear or hysteria, always talk to your pediatrician. Allergies, health conditions, trauma and other issues may trigger nightmares. It is also possible that the child is suffering from Night Terror Disorder. We’ll look at this latter condition in more detail in this article.

What is Night Terror Disorder?
Night Terror Disorder may be diagnosed when a youngster awakens from sleep with a loud scream, intense fear, rapid breathing and sweating – without any recollection of a dream. The child will seem confused as to where he is, what time it is and what is happening in the present moment. The child usually has no memory of the frightening dream. He is unresponsive to attempts to comfort him, although he may “return to himself” a few minutes later.

Children experiencing Night Terror Disorder may get out of bed and act as if they are fighting. During an episode of night terror, children are not fully awake and it may not be possible to awake them. The average bout of night terror usually last less than fifteen minutes. People with night terrors usually only have one episode a  week.

Night terrors are much more common during childhood than in adulthood. Night terrors usually begin sometime during the age of 4-12 and most often disappear sometime during adolescence. This disorder is more common in boys than it is in girls and is not associated with any psychological disorders in children.

Treatment of Night Terrors
As long as sleep terror is not interfering with the child’s life then there may be no need for medical treatment – your doctor will advise you. Simply waiting quietly with the child for the terror to pass is usually the best intervention. For instance, a parent can lie down beside the child until the child is calm again and falls back to sleep. Although parents may feel distress seeing their child so distressed, it’s helpful to keep in mind that the child will actually have no recall of the event the next morning! Sometimes just giving the child a few days of extra rest (early bedtimes) and a calming routine is enough to end a cycle of Sleep Terrors. However, if sleep terror disorder persists and is interfering with the child’s life there are some steps that are suggested for parents to take such as: rearranging bedroom furniture to avoid injuries, taking the child for some for of psychotherapy or play therapy and, if so inclined, looking into alternative treatments that may be helpful. For instance, some children have responded well to acupuncture in the treatment of their Night Terrors.

Experiment with Bach Flower Remedies
Bach Flower Therapy is a harmless treatment that might be helpful. For instance, during an episode of Night Terror, spray Rescue Remedy into the child’s mouth or drop liquid Rescue Remedy onto his or wrists – it might help calm the child down. Also, see if giving the child a personal Bach mixture might help reduce the frequency of the episodes – if it has no effect, there is no loss apart from a small cost of the remedies. The remedies Agrimony, Cherry Plum, Impatiens and Rock Rose might be especially helpful.

Medical Treatment
It is possible that certain breathing disorders may contribute to the development of Sleep Disorder and these should be ruled out by a medical practitioner. When such a disorder is present, treating the breathing disorder will relieve the night terrors. In particularly severe cases of Sleep Disorder, medication may be employed. A common medication for example is diazepam – a sleep-inducing medication that can sometimes prevent sleep terror from occurring during sleep.

When Your Child Comes Home Drunk

It is well-known that teenagers are in a stage of experimentation – they are exploring the world around them, the world of relationships and their own inner landscape. What feels right? What creates pleasure? What is meaningful? What relieves stress? What brings social, academic and personal success?

Somewhere along the way, most teens will encounter alcohol. Some will like what they find, indulging the substance more and more in order to gain social acceptance or psychic relief or both. Others will find that they don’t like the feeling that alcohol gives them and will move away from it toward other, healthier forms of stress relief and happiness. And some will find a small place in their lives in which to place consumption of alcoholic beverages – certain social situations like celebrations and other special gatherings. No matter what kids ultimately decide to do with alcohol, however, many will get drunk at least one time.  Some will do so accidentally, simply not knowing their limits. Others will do so intentionally. No matter how it happens, however, parents have to know how to handle the situation.

Below are some tips in handling a teenager who comes home drunk:

Stay Calm
There is such a thing as a “teaching moment.” This is a moment in which the child is calm and coherent and a moment in which the parent is also calm and coherent.  When either child or parent is not fully present due to overwhelming emotions (like anger, grief or fear) or impaired consciousness (i.e. not fully awake, drunk or stoned) no learning will occur.  In fact, talking to a drunken person is futile; alcohol significantly impairs comprehension and inhibition — your drunk teen doesn’t have the mental capacity to process your message, nor the ability to explain things properly. Therefore, when your child comes home drunk, wait until he or she sobers up before you try to deal with the issue. Let the child sleep it off – the best time to talk is likely to be the day after the incident.

Take the intervening time to settle your own nerves. You might be feeling alarmed, enraged, disappointed or otherwise extremely upset. Emotion, especially of an intense, hysterical or dramatic kind, will work against your goals. Remember – you shouldn’t be addressing the issue at all until you are calm enough for your child to be able to take you very seriously. This talk will be an important one – you don’t want to appear off-balance while you are trying to make important, life-impacting remarks. Staying calm, you help give your teen someone to take seriously, look up to and respect. You increase your power to provide education and guidance when you come across as a loving, concerned, firm, clear, knowledgeable and trustworthy adult. Try to get into that state before you hold a meeting with your teen!

Emergency Intervention
Do call your local emergency medical information line if your child’s state concerns you. You can describe your child’s behavior in the intoxicated state and if there is a concern, an ambulance will be sent out. It’s always better to err on the side of caution – there is no reason NOT to call and describe symptoms unless the symptoms are barely noticeable. However, sometimes a child is barely conscious. Sometimes he can’t stop vomiting. Sometimes he is experiencing alcohol poisoning. Unless you already know what to look for, make the call.

Appropriate Response
Even if you think it’s kind of “cute” or funny the first time your child comes home drunk, you should consider the importance of refraining from showing any kind of pride or pleasure in this behavior. Remind yourself that teens are very easily addicted and that addiction will bring them much suffering. Their careers, their relationships and their health can suffer serious negative consequences. Their drunken state can lead to their own or someone else’s death or permanent disability. A teenager may misread your cues, thinking that you are encouraging self-destructive behavior. Be careful to respond seriously and responsibly. Your child’s future is at risk. Everything you say and do at this critical time can have a life-long impact. Refrain from helping your child avoid current consequences of this particular episode – do not cover up. Help him to learn that there CAN be negative consequences. If nothing bad happened during this episode, then make sure you discuss with him at some point, what CAN happen when a person is drunk.

Know Where You Stand
Different parents have different rules on drinking; some demand total abstinence from alcohol, others allow drinking in moderation. Regardless of where you stand on the drinking issue, it’s important you address the situation of your teen coming home intoxicated. Alcohol is an easy drug to abuse. As previously stated, it can also be a dangerous drug leading to life-threatening accidents, legal problems and health problems. You might want to do some research to find out more about alcohol, the state of intoxication, addiction and other issues so that you can talk knowledgeably to your child. Inviting your child to do research WITH you might be even better! It’s best to create rules and guidelines that make sense in the light of the information you have about alcohol – such rules are more likely to be taken seriously by your child. Rules that “make no sense” tend to be defied by older kids. If you and your child do research together, you two can also formulate reasonable guidelines.

First Time Only
If this is the first time your child has come home drunk, education is the correct intervention. Punishment should be avoided. In fact, don’t mention negative consequences at all. If it happens again, however, make a rule that there will always be severe consequences for this in the future. The first two episodes are for education only – not punishment. All other episodes require heavy negative consequences (see the 2X Rule in Raise Your Kids without Raising Your Voice by Sarah Chana Radcliffe).

Seek Professional Help if Necessary
If you think your child is already abusing alcohol habitually, or is at risk of becoming an alcoholic, contract a substance abuse counselor. Alcoholism is an incurable, progressive and fatal disease – it’s best  to intervene as soon as possible.

Motor Tics (Twitches and Jerks)

Motor tics are repetitive, involuntary movements. They are like an itch that just must be scratched – a person may wait or delay the urge to tic, but in the end, just has to do it. A tic can manifest as eye-blinking, shoulder shrugging, head bobbing, upper body jerks, knee bending and any other repetitive movement. Some include head-banging and picking at one’s skin in this category as well, although these behaviors are technically disorders in their own right.

If the tics last less than a year and cause distress during that time, they may be diagnosed as “transient tic disorder.” If they last more than a year and are never absent for more than three consecutive months, and they cause some distress, they may be diagnosed as “chronic tic disorder.”

If motor tics occur along with vocal tics (grunts, barks, coughs, words, mental words and so on), causing significant distress, then “Tourette’s Syndrome” might be diagnosed. Only a doctor or clinical psychologist can provide an accurate diagnosis. All tics are thought to have a biological basis and some medications can “unmask” (trigger) a latent tic condition. Medications for ADD/ADHD, for instance, have been known to trigger tic disorders in vulnerable individuals. The term “nervous tic” does not pertain to motor tic disorder. One needn’t be nervous at all to have a tic disorder. In fact, tic disorders are thought to be inherited and related to other brain disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and ADHD. Indeed, many kids have all three disorders together.

Helping Your Child with Motor Tics
Although “causing distress” is part of the diagnostic criteria of a motor tic disorder, it is a fact that PARENTS might be more distressed by the child’s movements than is the child him or herself. In fact, the  parent may feel anxious or very annoyed by them. There can be a definite urge to scream “STOP DOING THAT!”  However, tic movements are outside both the realm of the parent’s control and the child’s control. This lack of control can  also cause distress to the child. Children may find their movements to be embarrassing in public situations. For this reason, they may strive to hold back an urge to tic while out of the house, only to “let loose” once in the privacy of home, “tic’ing” with a vengeance. It’s like having an itch that you stall until you get home and then you scratch madly to address the build-up of the tension.

Asking the child to refrain from doing his or her tic DOES NOT WORK and may even lead to an  increase in  tic activity because of the stress that the demand induces. When children feel watched or rejected for making movements, they’ll actually make MORE movements!

Although chronic tic disorders are considered to be really chronic –  lasting a lifetime –  many people do experience spontaneous remission. That is, the tics just disappear on their own at some point. Sometimes neurological or psychotropic medications can help and may be an appropriate intervention when motor tics are severe and having a negative impact in the child’s life.  Speak to your doctor about these possibilities. Sometimes behavioral therapies can help (find a psychologist who is experienced in the treatment of tic disorders). Bach Flower Remedies have helped many people with tic disorders (consult a practitioner for an individualized, appropriate formula for your child) and some people have benefited from homeopathic treatment and other alternative treatments. EFT (emotional freedom technique) may help some people with tic disorders. In fact, any form of alternative medicine that reduces physical and mental stress, may have a beneficial effect on the course of a tic disorder – one must experiment in order to find out if a particular treatment will help his or her child. And, as stated previously, some children and teens just “grow out of them” over time.