Child Ignores Alarm Clock

Whoever invented the snooze function in the alarm clock, is both a genius and a fool. The “genius” element stems from the fact that people don’t like to just suddenly jump out of bed in the morning – they crave a more gradual wake-up process, allowing body and mind to adjust to the new day in a series of small steps. When an alarm rings or buzzes, the sleeper wakes up, but by hitting the snooze function, he or she can drift back to sleep. The alarm sounds again and wakes the person again and the person hits it again, falling asleep again – but not very deeply. After a number of times of sleeping, hitting and waking, the person finally becomes alert and ready to start the day. The “fool” component of snooze alarms is that they actually train a person to IGNORE the alarm clock and continue to sleep in. Whereas the alarm is supposed to get the person out of bed, the snooze function allows them to stay in bed indefinitely!

If your child belongs to the “just one more minute” club, consider the following tips in weaning him or her off the habit:

Buy an Alarm with No Snooze Function
If your child knows that the first ring is the only chance of getting up on time, he or she might be more inclined to respond to that first ring.

Set a Limit for Snoozes
Buy an alarm clock that has limited snoozes allowed. Or perhaps an alarm clock that can be set for only one or two snooze hits. This way your child still gets to hit the snooze button— but not so many times that they end up sleeping in too late.

Be the Snooze Button
Snooze alarms are tempting to disobey because they are just machines – they don’t give you a disappointed look or a jarring physical shake. And if your child’s relationship wit the snooze button is really dysfunctional, perhaps you as a parent can help out. Once you hear the first alarm, just quietly enter the room and check if your child is already awake. If not, give them 2-5 minutes, and then wake them yourself by turning on the light, opening the blinds and talking to them or singing to them until they show signs of life or until 3 minutes have passed (whichever comes first). Leave the room and let your child get him or herself out of bed. The trick is to help but not to actually replace an alarm clock. Ultimately, your child has to learn how to get him or herself out of bed. Y

Place the Alarm Clock Far Away
Another technique is to just make it extremely difficult for your child to go back to sleep once the alarm has gone off. One way of doing this is to place the clock all across the room. This way, your child will have to stand up, walk to the clock, hit the snooze button, and travel all the way back to bed before he or she can resume sleeping. By the time your child’s head has hit the pillow again, he or she will be fairly awake already from the standing and the walking.  You might also consider the new “annoying” alarms that are available on the market – alarms that jump madly all over the room (and the child) until they are turned off, alarms that have a “boom” that will awaken the whole street, and alarms that get louder and louder, the longer they are left ringing.

Following the same principle, you may install many alarm clocks, and place them in different places. If your child has to attend to more than one ringer, he’ll be awake by the time he or she gets to the last!

Instill Healthy Sleeping Habits and Better Time Management Skills
At the end of the day, the best way to get children to rise on time is to ensure that they’ve had adequate sleep and that they know how to get themselves into bed at a reasonable time. Young children need to be regulated – it’s up to parents to establish bedtime routines and times. As the child gets older, however, he or she will have greater personal responsibility for getting into bed at the right time in order to get enough sleep. Parents can help by setting up negative consequences for failure to be in bed on time. For instance, a child who is supposed to be in bed at 9:15 but is wandering around the house or still playing on the computer at that time, may be subject to a rule that has been established such as, “failure to be in bed on time costs you X amount of your allowance dollars” or “failure to be on time means that I will not help you wake up in the morning” or whatever.

Use Consequences
Alternatively, make consequences for failing to be on school on time. Then leave it up to the child to figure out how to get out of bed by him or herself. Don’t tell the child what time to go to bed or how to get up. If the child really doesn’t like the consequence, the child will figure out how to use his or her alarm clock appropriately

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